(Movie) “The Conjuring 2” Review

“There was a crooked man… and he walked a crooked mile; The crooked man stepped forth and… rang the crooked bell; And thus his crooked soul… spiralled into a crooked Hell; Murdered his crooked family… and laughed a crooked laugh.”
-The Crooked Man, The Conjuring 2

BLog72

A horror movie! hopefully, some of you will not condemn me for this….I promise there won’t be that many horror movies here! 😀

After watching the first “Conjuring”, I truly believed that it was one well-made horror movie; scary characters, your common, yet seemingly effective message to go to Church, and a creepy backstory paired with interesting characters. All of those are strengthened by the fact that they utilized a controversial true story of the Warrens. After watching it, just like Insidious’ Parker Crane, the ghostly images of the scary encounters kept of replaying inside my mind (which is definitely unsettling).

Agreed, the movie had its flaws, but as long as a movie is enough to scare you somehow, then it doesn’t really matter that much, and that is exactly the sequel is capable of, although not as great as the first movie did.

“The Conjuring 2” brings back Ed and Lorraine Warren, two paranormal investigators who had been solving scary cases, including the infamous Anabelle and Amityville Murder. This time, they are tasked with investigating the case of the Hodgson family, where Janet, the oldest of four children, is claimed to have been possessed by an unknown evil entity.

The movie offers a pretty generic plot; a family is troubled, the Warrens come in to save the day, and the demons are exorcised. Still, this title manages to deliver that generic package into a creepy bundle of jumpscares and mysteriousness that are able to keep you interested with the film; from the interesting inclusion of the iconic Crooked Man and the famous ‘mirror’ scene; from scary scenes to interesting interactions and appearances, the movie delivers all of them, making the generic plotline forgivable.

To top things off, the thing that “The Conjuring” series and even the “Insidious” series do to shake things up is not about the scares and spooks, but rather, the drama blended into the dark tales of terror. Here, we get to witness Ed and Lorraine’s bond getting stronger, their trust for each other, and the extent of them willing to assist those in need. The realistic thing is that, we actually witness Lorraine’s struggle to weight between her responsibility to save those who are haunted as well as the risk of putting themselves, especially Ed in particular, in danger. This thought process of having her not playing the ‘always heroic’ role makes the movie more than just a horror movie. We are not simply caring about the horrifying moments, but the character development of the protagonists, and very few horror titles have managed to achieve this feat.

However, like many other title, the movie itself is not perfect, even as a horror movie. The scares are there, the development is there, the scary ‘based on true story’ label complete with actual photographs may be enough to render people in sleepless nights, but there are still moments where things are dragged on, specifically during the climax of the movie. It feels like things are getting dragged on longer in order for the final scenes to feel ‘exciting’ and built up, but that results in unrealistic actions coming from the characters, making the viewers more frustrated than feeling the adrenaline pumps intended.

Regardless, that is pretty much the only bothersome aspect of the movie; as for the rest, it’s definitely a gem in the modern-horror era.

Rating from me: 4/5

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